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About The Author

Dennis was born and raised in South Bend, Indiana, the youngest of three boys. The "seeds" for his passion for history were "planted" early in life. As a child residing in an older section of the community, Dennis was "held captive" visiting historical sites near his home. Riding his bicycle, he vividly recalls on numerous occasions visiting a Civil War training site. In addition, he particularly enjoyed admiring a huge oak tree called Council Oak where LaSalle conferred with the Miami Indians. While at these various historical sites, his imagination could run wild seeing Native American Indians, French explorers and soldiers training for the Civil War.

In the evenings, history remained in the forefront as Dennis would read and travel the world fantasying about Sherwood Forest in The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, or the Himalaya Mountains in Lost Horizon, just to name a few. Through his imagination, he was fortunate to grasp the significance of reading to "open the doors" to adventure, understanding and knowledge.

Dennis entered Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana and received a bachelor's degree in social science. HE then completed a tour of duty in the United States Marine Corps, serving in Vietnam. After leaving the Marines, he returned to Ball State as a teaching assistant and completed his master's degree in world history.

During the next thirty-two years Dennis taught United States history and future studies at Wheeling High School in Wheeling, Illinois near Chicago. His love for history and working with young people never subsided. He would always say that his "Work was his passion".

Dennis currently lives outside of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin where his fondness for teaching history has now been extended to writing historical novels.


A CONTROVERSIAL HISTORICAL FICTION NOVEL

The Eyes of the Comet:

An American Slave Odyssey

By Dennis Hague

In November of 1835 Halley's Comet reached its nearest point to the earth. Dubbed by many as "the year the star shot", it was witnessed around the world. Owing to superstition, it was perceived by many as the start of apocalyptic times. However, there were other inspired visionaries who considered it as a sign of great change to come.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT DENNIS:

dennishague@genevaonline.com

Dennis Hague is an active guest speaker & welcomes your inquiry.

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